1. Verified emails that are found and verified on the fly (not from a database).

If you give us a name and website, we form the email and ping the server to confirm its existence. It's not sitting in a database.

For example, if you enter in john smith, google.com then we would form john.smith@google.com to test if that email exists on their server.

That's why the delivery rate is so good. See the accuracy here: https://anymailfinder.com/accuracy/

2. 'Found on web' emails that do exist in a database.

'Found on web' emails are those we found in forums and on websites across the internet to build a database of emails.

This means you can upload a list of websites without names and we'll return whichever 'found on web' emails we have for each website.

The great thing? If we can't verify them then they are free. When you enter in just a website, we'll find emails for it in the database and then see if we can verify them. If we can't, they're free.

3. Pattern matched emails which are best guesses.

When we can't verify it, or find it on the web, we'll see if we can return a pattern matched email. 

How does this work? If most of the other emails for a website are john.smith@google.com, mary.spencer@google.com then Mark Turner will probably also be mark.turner@google.com. 

Pattern matched emails are free. If you want to find out if a pattern matched email is likely to be real then install Rapportive.com into gmail and put the email in your To: field to see if rapportive can find a social profile for that email address. 

Video overview

We charge one credit per verified result

It's one credit per verified result regardless of how many emails are returned. Learn more here: http://help.anymailfinder.com/basics/how-do-credits-work

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